Following a series of losses, McDonald’s has announced its turnaround plan. The company plans on reorganizing its international operations and selling some of its corporate sites to franchisees. McDonald’s hopes the plan will help reverse the downward trend in sales. As part of the plan, the company will organize its overseas market by maturity in the McDonald’s system – not by region. Currently, the market is split outside the US into Asia/Pacific, Europe, Africa and Middle East. The fast-food chain’s chief executive, Steve Easterbrook, also admitted to some of the chain’s blunders that led to its current slump.
One of Canada’s leading experts on potato insects, Christine Noronha is a pest control specialist at the Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada research centre in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. She offers these tips on managing the major pests threatening potato crops in Canada this season. Some important pests to watch for in 2015 are: Colorado potato beetles, potato flea beetles, aphids, wireworms, and potato leafhoppers.
Zebra chip is among the biggest threats to the U.S. potato industry. As part of a grant-funded outreach effort, the USDA Office of Pest Management Policy and the American Phytopathological Society are hosting a free zebra chip webinar May 7 at 10 a.m. Central. This one-hour webinar, titled “Overview of Zebra Chip Research in the U.S.,” will be presented by Dr. Charlie Rush, a plant pathologist at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center and a leading authority on zebra chip. It offers the latest essential information for growers, consultants, potato pathologists and industry and government personnel who work with the potato industry. In his presentation, Rush will talk about components of a wide-ranging response and recovery plan that focuses on the control of zebra chip.
For decades, prawn cocktail, salt and vinegar and cheese and onion were staple flavours of the British lunchbox. But it appears that the potato crisp is in decline. A snack industry survey shows that alternative, non-fried savoury snacks including tortilla chips, and biscuits such as Mini Cheddars, are now selling outselling crisps in Britain. The UK crisp market is worth £923.2 million, down 2 per cent in the past year, according to the Grocer magazine.
Potato prices in South Korea more than doubled in April from a year earlier amid the continued popularity of honey-flavored potato chips among local consumers, industry data showed Monday. The wholesale price of a 20-kilogram box of white-skinned superior potatoes, a variety that suits chips, came to 49,568 won (US$45.85) last month, up 122 percent from 22,295 won a year earlier, according to data compiled by the state-run Korean Rural Economic Institute (KREI). The April price also marks a 62 percent jump from last year’s average price of 34,576 won.
The National Potato Council (NPC) in the US is now accepting applications for a USD 10,000 graduate-level scholarship to be applied toward the 2015-2016 academic year. Each year, NPC awards one scholarship to a graduate student pursuing advanced studies (Master’s degree or higher) that will improve the future of the U.S. potato industry. Final scholarship selection is based on academic achievement, leadership abilities and the potential commercial value of the applicant’s academic work. The 2014 scholarship winner was Washington Luis da Silva, who is a plant pathology Ph.D. student at Cornell University.
USDA moved another variety of genetically engineered potatoes developed by J.R. Simplot Company forward in its approval process, the agency announced on Friday. The potato, a Russet Burbank variety, is genetically engineered for late blight resistance, reduced black spot bruising, and lowered reducing sugars. They are also engineered to produce less acrylamide, a potential carcinogen. USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) found that the product is unlikely to pose a plant pest risk to agricultural crops and other plants and plant products.
The new potato trade in the German wholesale markets is slowly picking up speed. This is evident from the newsletter KW 17/15 from the Ministry of Agriculture and Food (BLE). Imported new potatoes from Italy increased the available range of new potatoes, which in previous weeks was still quite small. The new potatoes from Cyprus and Morocco increased too. New in the assortment of Frankfurt Wholesalers was Annabelle, a new potato from Israel.
The Egyptian government is requesting a visit to the U.S. this year to approve expanded access for seed potatoes from all U.S. states. Egypt approved California as a seed potato export state following a visit by Egyptian authorities to the state last fall. Egyptian authorities have now informed USDA-APHIS that they are willing to approve other seed producing states pending an additional visit to the U.S. this summer.
University of Idaho is working to fill the positions of two retiring agricultural faculty members and has made an offer to an internal candidate to head its Tetonia Research and Extension Center. UI Extension seed potato pathologist Phil Nolte, who had served as the rural research facility’s superintendent since February of 2011, retired on April 30, following 24 years of serving the spud industry with the university. UI Extension economist, Paul Patterson, will retire in June.
Een revolutionaire vorm van plantverbetering die het gebruik van bestrijdingsmiddelen bij appels en aardappels halveert, wordt tegengehouden uit vrees voor genetische vervuiling. Milieubeweging Greenpeace stookt het vuurtje op. Ze zijn tegen technologie’, zegt een verontwaardigde plantonderzoeker Henk Schouten in Dit is de Dag. Schouten – werkzaam bij Plant Research International aan de Wageningen Universiteit – heeft appels en aardappels ontwikkeld die resistent zijn tegen schimmels en andere ziekten, waardoor ze minder zwaar bespoten hoeven te worden met bestrijdingsmiddelen.
Americans are shunning McDonald’s. The fast-food giant is one of the most iconic brands in the US – but with sales there down for six quarters in a row, the burger chain’s new British chief executive needs to lure Americans back. The US is the largest and most important market for McDonald’s. And the Golden Arches are ingrained in the American palate and psyche. But can nostalgia save the company as Americans increasingly choose healthier, more tailored fast food? For some consumers, the bad press McDonald’s has received in recent years has forever altered their opinion of the burger chain.
When you open up a fresh bag of chips, there is always that slight moment of disappointment. You peer inside to see that a large fraction of the bag is not chips, but air. It has gotten to the point where there is an abundance of complaints and jokes about the aforementioned lack of product. The air in each bag of chips is there as a form of protection. The concept of using an air cushion to protect fragile products such as chips is already an innovative idea, but the science behind it goes a bit further. The “air” in the bag is not actually air.
With potato growers facing constant challenges to increase their marketable crop, the industry sees an important new project getting under way, writes Sophie Lock, of the AHDB Potato Council. The first Strategic Potato Farm – SPot Farm for short – has been created at a farm owned and managed by forward-thinking grower James Daw, near Rugeley. This exciting new project aims to demonstrate to potato growers the benefits of levy-funded research and development for practical and commercial farm environments. Now live, SPot Farm is a highly collaborative project funded by AHDB Potato Council.
The National Potato Council (NPC) is now accepting applications for a USD 10,000 graduate-level scholarship to be applied toward the 2015-2016 academic year. Each year, NPC awards one scholarship to a graduate student pursuing advanced studies (Master’s degree or higher) that will improve the future of the U.S. potato industry. Final scholarship selection is based on academic achievement, leadership abilities and the potential commercial value of the applicant’s academic work. The 2014 scholarship winner was Washington Luis da Silva, who is a plant pathology Ph.D. student at Cornell University.
USDA moved another variety of genetically engineered potatoes developed by J.R. Simplot Company forward in its approval process, the agency announced on Friday. The potato, a Russet Burbank variety, is genetically engineered for late blight resistance, reduced black spot bruising, and lowered reducing sugars. They are also engineered to produce less acrylamide, a potential carcinogen. USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) found that the product is unlikely to pose a plant pest risk to agricultural crops and other plants and plant products.
Staying ahead of potato blight is critical to a successful growing season, which is why Syngenta is partnering with experts again to ensure that the latest disease updates remain just a phone call away. The hotlines, sponsored by Revus Top® fungicide, feature updates from five university potato researchers in Idaho, Michigan, North Dakota, Oregon and Washington. “These five universities have provided the potato industry with a great deal of valuable research and insight over the years," said Kiran Shetty, Ph.D., Syngenta technical development lead. “Given how much these hotlines have helped growers in staying ahead of key disease threats, it was a simple decision for Syngenta to continue our partnership with these researchers."
One of Canada’s leading experts on potato diseases, Khalil Al-Mughrabi is a pathologist at the New Brunswick Department of Agriculture’s Potato Development Centre and the chairman of the National Late Blight Working Group. In this article published by SpudSmart magazine, he offers several tips for warding off the major disease threats facing potato producers this season, including late blight, PVY, fusarium dry rot, pink rot, soft rot, Pythium leak, silver scurf, Rhizoctonia canker and blackleg.
As had been speculated for a while in the media, the north west European potato area is estimated to decrease by 2.5% to 530,000 hectares in the coming season. During the NEPG talks last week, the representatives of all 5 NEPG countries indicated they expected a decrease in area. For Great Britain it was just slightly too early to estimate. Based on the 5 year average of 47.2 tonnes per hectare the total harvest should be 25.2 million tonnes, 11.6% less than in the previous year.
A small field on an island off the Netherlands’ northern coast promises one answer to the problem of how to feed the world’s ever-growing population: potatoes and other crops that grow in saltwater. Every day, swathes of farmland somewhere in the world become unusable because of salty soil, but farmers on windswept Texel are finding solutions using traditional methods. The team headed by farmer Mark van Rijsselberghe has planted around 30 types of potato and their approach is simple: anything that dies in the saline environment is abandoned, and anything that lives “we try to follow up on,” said Van Rijsselberghe. “It’s faster.”
Zoals al langer werd gespeculeerd in de media zal het Noordwest Europees aardappelareaal in het komende seizoen naar schatting verminderen met 2,5% naar 530.000 hectare. Tijdens het NEPG overleg eind vorige week gaven de vertegenwoordigers van alle 5 de NEPG landen aan een verlaging van het areaal te verwachten.
Offering organic potatoes is a winning move for some conventional grower-shippers. Idaho Falls, Idaho-based Potandon Produce LLC has put its own brand on a line of organic potatoes that hit the market in February. Red, russet and yellow potatoes are packed in 3-pound poly bags and distributed from sites in Ohio, Wisconsin, Massachusetts and Washington. Bancroft, Wis.-based RPE says its three organic varieties introduced last year under the petite-sized Tasteful Selections brand, and organic russets, reds and golds packed under the Old Oak Farms label, are all doing well.
A McDonald’s joint venture in China supplying its outlets with French fries has been slapped with a record 3.9 million yuan (HK$4.9 million) fine for water pollution, state media reported. The fine levied against Beijing Simplot Food Processing was the largest ever meted out by the city of Beijing for pollution, the state-run Xinhua news agency said, citing the municipal environmental watchdog. Beijing Simplot Food Processing is a joint venture between US agribusiness J.R. Simplot Company, McDonald’s and the Beijing Agricultural, Industrial and Commerce General Company, Xinhua said. Beijing Simplot makes French fries and hash browns for McDonald’s.
IVORY RUSSET

 

 

 

Klik op bovenstaande afbeelding om ons duurzaamheidsverslag te bekijken!

Om deze website optimaal te laten functioneren gebruiken wij cookies. Voor meer informatie zie ons cookiebeleid.